PCORI Board Approves $142.5 Million to Fund Expansion Phase of PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network

WASHINGTON, DC (July 21, 2015) – The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Board of Governors today approved nearly $142.5 million to support the ongoing development and expansion of an ambitious new resource for health research known as PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

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A media-savvy caregiver brings Alzheimer’s patients to the table in drug research

Meryl Comer sat on stage at the BIO International Convention in San Diego last month between two prominent scientists: Francis S. Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, and Jan M. Lundberg, head of R&D at Eli Lilly & Co. The three were on hand to discuss the Accelerating Medicines Partnership, or AMP, a new public-private drug discovery consortium. A former television news reporter who now heads the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative, Comer leveraged her mastery of visual communication to solidly upstage her copanelists.

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Deaths from Alzheimer’s more than reported, study says

Alzheimer’s disease accounts for many more deaths than we’ve realized, a new study concludes, making it nearly as lethal as the nation’s two biggest killers, heart disease and cancer.

Death certificates record immediate cause of death, but often miss the underlying cause, which is why Alzheimer’s has been undercounted, according to Bryan James, an epidemiologist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who led the research.

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AMPlifying targets

C. Simone FIshburn, February 27, 2014, SciBX – Science-Business eXchange

Although small- and medium-sized biotechs are absent from the NIH’s new Accelerated Medicines Partnership with industry and not-for-profit organizations, consortium leaders expect that making results publicly available on their search for new targets and biomarkers in four diseases will benefit all players. However, it is unclear whether the $230 million, 5-year fund is adequately financed to meet the partnership’s goal of accelerating target discovery.

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Women Are Disproportionately Affected By Alzheimer’s, As Patients And Caregivers

Alzheimer’s disease is plaguing the public psyche in two ways — both as a global economic disaster waiting to happen and up close and personal as the insidious stalker in the room that anyone over 40 should fear. The pervasive, destructive, costly effects of this debilitating disease become even more profound as Baby Boomers age; doubling every five years after age 65.

Fear this intruder if you value your brain: your intellect, abstract thinking, the ability to communicate, your independence and dignity. According to researchers, the creep of entrapment begins 10 to 20 years before revealing itself through more obvious outward symptoms, eventually depriving not only an individual, but their family, of their future.

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Maximizing crowd engagement on male/female differences in Alzheimer’s disease

Last week I was privileged to represent InnoCentive at the Alzheimer’s Disease Summit: The Path to 2025 at the New York Academy of Sciences, supporting the final stage of the 2013 Geoffrey Beene Global NeuroDiscovery Challenge.

Made possible by the collaboration of Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative (GBFAI), Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Medicine, Women Against Alzheimer’s Network, 21st Century BrainTrust™, BrightFocus Foundation, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Boston, Mass Bio, and Society for Women’s Health Research; and powered by InnoCentive, this challenge asked Solvers to identify male/female differences and the impact on neurodegenerative progression leading to Alzheimer’s disease.

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Preliminary Winners Named in Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative

The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, in association with the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer’s Initiative, announced the top four winners of the preliminary round of the first-ever challenge to identify male/female differences in Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

Each winner will share $50,000 in awards.

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FNIH, Geoffrey Beene Foundation Name Winner of Alzheimer’s Challenge

To advance the study of male/female differences in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the organizers of a neurodiscovery challenge have announced the winner of the $50,000 grand prize. The organizers—the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) and the Geoffrey Beene Foundation—had narrowed the field of potential winners to just three. Ultimately, in a voting process that included public participation, the winner emerged: Enrico Glaab, Ph.D., a research associate at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, University of Luxembourg.

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Winner of the Geoffrey Beene Global Neurodiscovery Challenge

Enrico Glaab, Ph.D., the winner of the Geoffrey Beene Global Neurodiscovery Challenge, will use his prize to continue his study of age-related gender differences in brain expression levels of a particular protein, tau-interacting ubiquitin-specific peptidase 9, and possible implications for Alzheimer’s disease.

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Thank You for Participating in the 2013 Geoffrey Beene Global NeuroDiscovery Challenge!

Congratulations to Luxembourg researcher Enrico Glaab, Ph.D., who yesterday won the $50,000 Geoffrey Beene Global NeuroDiscovery Challenge for research proposals on gender differences in Alzheimer’s disease. Glaab, of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine at the University of Luxembourg, will examine whether certain genes are expressed differently in men and women, and whether one gene (USP9Y) may be protective in men, explaining the increased risks for Alzheimer’s disease in women.

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